Teitl: Data from publication: Augmenting microbially induced carbonate precipitation of soil with the capability to self-heal

Dyfyniad
Botusharova SP, Gardner DR, Harbottle M (2020). Data from publication: Augmenting microbially induced carbonate precipitation of soil with the capability to self-heal. Cardiff University. http://doi.org/10.17035/d.2020.0097363828


Hawliau Mynediad: Darperir Data dan drwydded Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY 4.0)
Dull Mynediad: I anfon cais i gael y data hwn, ebostiwch opendata@caerdydd.ac.uk

Crewyr y Set Ddata o Brifysgol Caerdydd

Manylion y Set Ddata
Cyhoeddwr: Cardiff University
Dyddiad (y flwyddyn) pryd y daeth y data ar gael i'r cyhoedd: 2020
Fformat y data: .xlsx
Amcangyfrif o gyfanswm maint storio'r set ddata: Llai na 100 megabeit
Nifer y ffeiliau yn y set ddata: 1
DOI: 10.17035/d.2020.0097363828

Disgrifiad

The data describes a demonstration of the potential for a simple and durable self-healing mechanism to be incorporated within the MICP process which allows a microbially-cemented mass of sand to automatically respond to and heal damage. 

Research results based upon these data are published at http://doi.org/10.1061/(ASCE)GT.1943-5606.0002214

The data is presented in a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet with 7 worksheets, each referring to one of the figures in the above publication, and comprising:

Figure 4 - Microbial growth curves (optical density versus time) under conditions with/without sterilisation and with/without biomineralisation for two species of bacteria.

Figure 5 - a) pH changes with time over multiple cycles of bacterial mineralisation. b) Microbial growth curves (optical density versus time) from microbially produced crystals stored for 3 and 6 months.

Figure 7 - variation in pH and calcium concentration in solution during microbial cementation of sand over two stages (initial and healing after chemical damage).

Figure 8 - mass loss on ignition for columns 1-3 (after initial healing), 4-6 (after chemical damage) and 7-9 (after re-healing)

Figure 9 - variation in pH, calcium concentration in solution and hydraulic conductivity during microbial cementation of sand over two stages (initial and healing after physical damage).

Figure 10 - stress versus strain after initial cementatio,n and after physical damage and subsequent healing.

Figure 11 - mass loss on ignition for columns subjected to physical damage and microbial self-healing


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Diweddarwyd y tro diwethaf ar 2020-10-12 am 11:56